6/29/2009

Sti.Petri et Pauli

Today a morning post on behalf of the Peter & Paul´s - Day. It is the most popular feast of any Apostles since the medieval ages, and the (State) -Holiday of Vatican city. As everybody should know, Peter was the first one chosen to follow Our Lord on earth. Paul, on the other hand was a merchant from Damascus named originally Saul, well known then for his hatred towards christians, until he, on a travel to Jerusalem, was blinded by God who told Saul, that he must not hate the christians, as this meant, he would hate His Son as well. In fear and pain Saul asked God for remedy and promised to seek the community as His servant, where upon God lifted his blindness. Paul, as he named himself after this, became eventually the last Apostle, and the only one, who never met Jesus on earth. He was the most powerful preacher of the Evangelium and an avid exeget. It is said, that Peter and Paul died at the same day.

4 comments:

MartininBroda said...

Your post has inspired me to write something too. Is H. really so boring how people say, have an nice trip.

naturgesetz said...

Thanks for reminding us of the day, Pilgrim. The work of these apostles is surely the most important for the growth and development of Christianity in their time. Sts. Peter and Paul are the principal subjects of the Acts of the Apostles. Peter was designated — in the gospel of Matthew — as the rock on which Jesus would build his church, or his faith was the rock. In the gospel of John, Jesus tells Peter to feed Jesus' sheep and predicts Peter's martyrdom. Peter baptized the Roman centurion Cornelius and his household: the first major step of Christianity beyond it's Jewish roots; but Paul was much more active in preaching the faith to Gentiles. Paul's letters to some of the churches he founded and others are the earliest writings of the New Testament.

naturgesetz said...

P.S. I know you knew that, just adding a bit for the benefit of other readers who may not have had a comparable religious education.

James said...

Unless, of course, you believe that St. John is not dead. ;)